21 Hanukkah Recipes to Light Up Every Night

By | August 23, 2016

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[Photographs: J. Kenji López-Alt, Carrie Vasios Mullins]

With most holiday meals, you’re pressured to go all out on a single day. Hanukkah has the benefit of lasting for eight days, which gives you over a week to eat your fill. After the crazy stress of Thanksgiving it’s nice to slow down and try a variety of dishes at a slower pace. To keep you satisfied through all eight nights of Hanukkah we’ve collected 21 recipes, from festive mains like sous vide rack of lamb and whole roasted fish, to parve soups, salads, and sides, as well as traditional (and not-so-traditional) desserts.

Mains

Sous Vide Rack of Lamb

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Lamb is a fairly lean meat, which makes it susceptible to overcooking. Rather than risk ruining a nice rack of lamb on the stove, we recommend cooking it sous vide to guarantee that it comes out perfectly medium-rare. Don’t have a sous vide circulator? You can get results that are just as good with a beer cooler and a thermometer.

Get the recipe for Sous Vide Rack of Lamb »

Slow-Roasted Boneless Leg of Lamb With Garlic, Rosemary, and Lemon

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

If you paid attention to last week’s roast roundup, you know that we’re big believers in the reverse sear. One of the most surefire ways to properly cook a big piece of meat is to roast it at a very low temperature until it’s just about done and then searing it in an oven cranked up as hot as you can get it. The technique is perfect for this leg of lamb stuffed with garlic, rosemary, and lemon zest.

Get the recipe for Slow-Roasted Boneless Leg of Lamb With Garlic, Rosemary, and Lemon »

Chicken Schnitzel

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[Photograph: Joshua Bousel]

If you’re not in the mood to make lamb, our chicken schnitzel is always a crowd-pleaser, and it’s pretty simple. All you have to do is pound chicken breasts, brine them for maximum juiciness, and fry them in a coating of homemade breadcrumbs. You might be tempted to deep-fry the chicken, but pan-frying is easier, and flipping the schnitzel more than once ensures even browning.

Get the recipe for Chicken Schnitzel »

Whole Roasted Fish With Oregano, Parsley, and Lemon

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[Photograph: Daniel Gritzer]

Whole roasted fish is a Hanukkah classic that seems much more intimidating to prepare than it actually is. Pick out a fresh fish and have your fishmonger clean it for you—after that it’s just a matter of brining it in salt water, stuffing the cavity with aromatics, and roasting for about 25 minutes. Take a look at our carving guide to make sure the fish ends up looking as good as it tastes.

Get the recipe for the Whole Roasted Fish With Oregano, Parsley, and Lemon »

Parve Soups, Salads, and Sides

Old-Fashioned Latkes

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[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

You absolutely can’t celebrate Hanukkah without latkes. A perfect latke should have a plump center that tapers down to wispy edges and a deeply browned crust. This classic recipe is made with russet potatoes, onion, eggs, and matzo meal. If you’re willing to break with tradition, try some of our unusual latke variations.

Get the recipe for Old-Fashioned Latkes »

Applesauce

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[Photograph: Joshua Bousel]

You’re going to need some applesauce to serve with those latkes. You could go with the stuff from a jar, but perfect latkes deserve homemade applesauce. Our recipe uses a mix of Golden Delicious apples (which cook down into a smooth sauce) and Fujis (which maintain a little bit of a bite).

Get the recipe for Applesauce »

Beet and Wheat Berry Salad With Pickled Apples and Pecans

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[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

This vegetarian salad is hearty enough to be a whole meal thanks to the combination of chewy wheat berries, tender roasted beets, and crunchy pecans. In addition to the roasted beet root, we also sauté the leaves and stems and mix them in. Bright pickled apples keep the salad from feeling too heavy.

Get the recipe for Beet and Wheat Berry Salad With Pickled Apples and Pecans »

Make-Ahead Roasted Squash and Kale Salad With Spiced Nuts, Cranberries, and Maple Vinaigrette

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Another make-ahead option, this salad combines roasted butternut squash with roasted kale in a sweet maple vinaigrette. Crunchy pecans and chewy dried cranberries add some textural contrast. Feel free to eat this right after making it, but it will get even better if it sits in the fridge for a night.

Get the recipe for Make-Ahead Roasted Squash and Kale Salad With Spiced Nuts, Cranberries, and Maple Vinaigrette »

Roasted Cauliflower With Pine Nut, Raisin, and Caper Vinaigrette

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

When roasting cauliflower we like to use high heat, which caramelizes the brassica and brings out its sweet, nutty flavor. It’s a good idea to cut the cauliflower into thick wedges to maximize the contrast between crisp edges and tender interior. You could finish it with a drizzle of olive oil and call it a day, but for something more festive try a vinaigrette made with pine nuts, raisins, and capers.

Get the recipe for Roasted Cauliflower With Pine Nut, Raisin, and Caper Vinaigrette »

Fried Brussels Sprouts With Shallots, Honey, and Balsamic Vinegar

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Like cauliflower, Brussels sprouts should be cooked hot and fast. A hot oven will make them wonderfully sweet and nutty, but deep-frying them is even better. The edges of the leaves get super crispy—perfect for catching a sweet-tart dressing made with honey and balsamic vinegar.

Get the recipe for Fried Brussels Sprouts With Shallots, Honey, and Balsamic Vinegar »

Beet and Citrus Salad With Pine Nut Vinaigrette

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

I love the earthy flavor of roasted beets, but they take forever to cook. Wrapping the beets in foil before throwing them in the oven makes them steam and cook faster. There are tons of ways to serve beets—here we make them into a refreshing salad with grapefruit and orange segments, pine nuts, and a sherry vinaigrette.

Get the recipe for the Beet and Citrus Salad With Pine Nut Vinaigrette »

Vegan Cream of Mushroom Soup With Crispy Shiitake Chips

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

This mushroom soup is so creamy that you might not believe it’s parve. The trick to the texture is bulking up the porcini, shiitake, and white mushroom base with white bread, which serves as an emulsifier. Be careful at the supermarket, though—a lot of shelf-stable white bread contains either milk solids or whey.

Get the recipe for Vegan Cream of Mushroom Soup With Crispy Shiitake Chips »

Easy Lentil Soup With Lemon Zest, Garlic, and Parsley

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

I’ve always felt that lentil soup can be a little boring, but this version has plenty of flavor thanks to gremolata, an Italian condiment made with lemon zest, parsley, and garlic. We sauté some of the gremolata with the vegetables and drizzle the rest on top of the finished soup.

Get the recipe for Easy Lentil Soup With Lemon Zest, Garlic, and Parsley »

Roasted Sweet Potato Soup With Pistachio, Orange, and Mint Salsa

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[Photograph: Vicky Wasik]

The secret to this soup is a sauce similar to gremolata that we make with crushed pistachios, orange zest, scallions, mint, and olive oil. It adds brightness and tons of depth to an already-tasty sweet potato soup. The soup can be made with chicken or vegetable stock—if you go with the latter, the recipe is parve.

Get the recipe for Roasted Sweet Potato Soup With Pistachio, Orange, and Mint Salsa »

Roasted Squash and Raw Carrot Soup

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[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

We wanted to get the most intense vegetable flavor possible for this soup, so instead of using water as the base for a roasted squash soup we used bright raw carrot juice instead. The soup gets a simple garnish of fresh chopped parsley and crunchy toasted pumpkin seeds.

Get the recipe for Roasted Squash and Raw Carrot Soup »

Desserts

Easy Chocolate Rugelach

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[Photograph: Yvonne Ruperti]

When it comes to dessert, you’ve gotta have rugelach. This version has a tender butter crust and a flavorful (but not overly sweet) filling made with bittersweet chocolate and cocoa powder. The dough freezes well after rolling, so you can make one big batch and bake fresh cookies throughout the week.

Get the recipe for Easy Chocolate Rugelach »

Pumpkin Pie Rugelach

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[Photograph: Carrie Vasios Mullins]

By December you might be a little over pumpkin pie, but if you’re not sick of it yet then try taking the same flavors of pumpkin, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves and wrapping them in a cream cheese dough to make rugelach that are extra seasonally appropriate. Walnuts give these a little crunch to contrast with the smooth pumpkin butter.

Get the recipe for Pumpkin Pie Rugelach »

Cranberry Orange Rugelach

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[Photograph: Carrie Vasios Mullins]

Another fall-friendly rugelach variation, this one is made with dried cranberries, orange zest, and apricot preserves. One of the hardest parts about making rugelach is rolling up the dough without stretching it out too much—go slow and you should be fine.

Get the recipe for Cranberry Orange Rugelach »

Cranberry Sauce Jelly Doughnuts

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[Photograph: Cakespy]

Called sufganiyot in Hebrew, jelly doughnuts are another traditional Hanukkah dessert. This recipe gives the doughnuts a fall twist by filling them with cranberry sauce instead of jelly. A jellied cranberry sauce will have the most traditional texture, but you can use a whole-berry sauce as long as you spoon it into the doughnuts instead of trying to pipe it.

Get the recipe for Cranberry Sauce Jelly Doughnuts »

Apple Cider Doughnut Mini Muffins

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[Photograph: Anna Markow]

Fried doughnuts are traditional, but they’re also a ton of work. This much easier recipe mimics apple cider doughnuts without using a deep fryer by rolling mini muffins in melted butter and cinnamon as soon as they come out of the oven.

Get the recipe for Apple Cider Doughnut Mini Muffins »

Orange Olive Oil Cake With Candied Walnuts

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[Photograph: Carrie Vasios Mullins]

This dairy-free cake is wonderfully moist, thanks to the rather sophisticated combination of olive oil and freshly squeezed orange juice. You want to go with an olive oil that’s on the fruity side to best complement the citrus. Candied almonds finish the cake beautifully and provide textural contrast.

Get the recipe for Orange Olive Oil Cake With Candied Walnuts »

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